The bad side of ballet training

Research has suggested that ballet training may encourage young students to suppress negative emotions, demonstrating potential psychological harm of ballet. Whilst this is rather a bold statement, research has revealed that studying music, for example, promotes a variety of cognitive and emotional benefits, whereas the results are more mixed for dance training, ballet in particular.

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The Pina Bausch Legacy

The late choreographer Pina Bausch has had an almost constant presence on London stages so far throughout 2017. The 40th London International Mime Festival opened in January with Smashed: Special Edition, Gandini Juggling’s homage to Pina Bausch. In February Bausch’s company, Tanztheater Wuppertal, returned to Sadler’s Wells with her Masurca Fogo. In March, English National Ballet become the second company in the world to be granted permission to perform Pina Bausch’s extraordinary reading of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring.

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Ballet Black at artsdepot

Ballet Black will present a triple bill of bold choreography on 28 March, founded in 2001 as Cassa Pancho’s award-winning, neo-classical ballet company. The bill will blend classical and contemporary choreography which is both narrative and abstract. The company celebrates international dancers of black and Asian descent and aims to bring ballet to a more culturally diverse audience by showcasing the talent of these dancers from around the world.

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The Dance Register

The Dance RegisterThe Dance Register, the directory of UK-based dance teachers and leaders created by DTAP (Dance Training & Accreditation Partnership), champions and promotes high quality dance teaching and leadership. It includes teachers and leaders working in a wide range of dance styles and settings – from ballet and bollywood to ballroom, and salsa and Spanish to street!

It provides a nationally recognised ‘one-stop shop’ for people looking for a suitably qualified and experienced dance teachers in their area by providing public access to a directory of dance teachers in the UK who work across a range of styles. It enables dance employers, parents, carers and participants to identify dance teachers who are committed to professional practice and it increases standards of dance teaching and leadership by ensuring teachers who join The Dance Register are committed to regular training and CPD.

You can utilise The Dance Register using a range of search options, including by postcode, dance style and age group. You can then access more information about a dance teacher (e.g. level of experience, qualifications, recent training/CPD) from their individual profile. Searching is free throughout the online directory. All teachers listed have passed The Dance Register minimum entry requirements and have signed the code of professional conduct. In addition, The Dance Register provides basic quality assurance for anyone looking to access or employ quality dance teaching and leading.

It is accessible to dance teachers through membership of one of The Dance Register gateway organisations such as Council for Dance Education and Training (CDET), Dance UK, the Exercise Movement and Dance Partnership (EMDP) and the Foundation for Community Dance (FCD).

Mamma Mia! Celebrates 15 Years!

Mamma Mia!On 6 April, the global smash hit musical MAMMA MIA! celebrated its 15th birthday in London’s West End. Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, stars of iconic band group ABBA who have rarely performed together since the four disbanded in 1982, then joined the cast of MAMMA MIA! in a musical finale at this year’s Olivier Awards as part of the celebrations. The show was televised for the ITV highlights show, broadcast on 13 April. 2014 also marks the 40th anniversary of the start of ABBA’s global success with the release of the hit track ‘Waterloo’.

MAMMA MIA! is Judy Craymer’s ingenious vision of staging the story-telling magic of ABBA’s timeless songs with an enchanting tale of family and friendship unfolding on a Greek island. To date, it has been seen by more than 54 million people in 39 productions, in 14 different languages, grossing more than $2 billion at the box office. MAMMA MIA! originally opened in London at the Prince Edward Theatre on 6 April 1999, before transferring to the Prince of Wales Theatre in 2004. The musical re-opened at the Novello Theatre in 2012 and has now extended its booking period to 25 April 2015.

Now a global phenomenon, the London production of MAMMA MIA! has been seen by more than 10% of the entire UK population. The show has celebrated over 6,200 performances in London and has broken box office records in all three of its London homes. In 2011, it became the first Western musical ever to be staged in Mandarin in the People’s Republic of China. This summer, the MAMMA MIA! International Tour will play an exclusive UK Summer Season at the Blackpool Opera House from 20 June to 14 September 2014: Blackpool will be the only UK venue outside of London to host the worldwide hit musical this year.

MOVE IT For Gemma Coldicott

Gemma ColdicottGemma Coldicott, Step into Dance’s Inclusive Dance Development Officer, has a wealth of dance experience. From studying Dance in the Community at Laban to gaining a Masters in Inclusive Arts Practice from the University of Brighton, Gemma is a leader in her field. Since her studies Gemma now works to mentor and support freelancers teaching inclusive dance sessions, leads inclusive dance training courses, writes training resources and is currently the company Director of SLiDE (South London Inclusive Dance Experience).

When did you begin dancing, where and why?

I started dancing aged 3 in my hometown of Norwich. My mum took me to the local ballet school, I guessed I asked to go but maybe she dragged me along. But I’m so glad she did!

What were your early years of dancing and training like?

I did 15 years of ISTD Ballet, Tap and Modern, until I was 18.

What does dance mean for you?

Dance means expression and freedom. It has the power to change lives and to bring diverse groups of people together.

How long have you been working as an inclusive dance practitioner? How did it begin?

Ever since I left Laban in 2007! Shortly after I finished training I participated in a project with Heart n Soul, a learning disabled arts organisation based in Deptford. It was a dance project with 60 people, disabled/non disabled, and culminated in a performance on the steps outside the National Portrait Gallery in Trafalgar Square. It was an amazing experience and I understood from then on what I wanted to do, to give people access to dance who might not ordinarily get the chance.

What is a ‘typical’ day like?

Answer emails from 8am and post on social media. 10am, visit a dance class at an SEN school on the Step into Dance School somewhere in London, give the teacher feedback and support. Head back to the RAD office and complete emails, observation reports. I then attend or teach a community dance class.

What’s the best part of dance for you?

That it brings a smile to people’s faces who are both dancing and watching! It’s also the relationship between music and dance, it connects the mind, body and soul.

What would you say was your greatest dance achievement to date?

That 80 people attended my inclusive dance training days at the RAD last year, from all across the country. To share my skills and knowledge in this way feels great.

What advice would you give to someone aspiring to be part of the dance industry?

Do as much assisting, shadowing as you can with teachers and practitioners you respect. Be professional at all times, always be on time and be reliable. Attend courses and workshops at venues such as gDA for professional development; you never know who you are going to meet at these things. The key word is networking!

What’s next for you?

At the moment I am working hard at Step into Dance to get SEN and mainstream schools dancing together. I am hosting afternoons of dance called ‘Step togethers’ whereby disabled and nondisabled students dance together and perform for each other. Our aim on the Step into Dance programme is to promote inclusion and equality for young people across London and I think we are really achieving this.

Which classes are you holding at MOVE IT?

At MOVE IT I am running a workshop called ‘Introduction to Inclusive Dance Practice’. I shall be focusing on facilitation skills and running creative tasks with mixed ability groups. I hope to give everyone more confidence in leading creative dance sessions and some key ‘tools’ to take back and apply in their own settings.

Teaching Routes To The Same Goal

Dance Class

Teaching vocational theatre and dance is the subject of much discussion with many training options available, and students with different learning styles, such as through visual cues, hearing cues and doing things actively.

What makes a good teacher?

Theatre and music teachers in vocational schools play a specialised role in student development, taking time to develop their skills by giving information and guidance to progress quickly. Some teachers do this by sharing industry contacts, careers advice and specialist teachers.

At vocational school specialist teachers apply both experience and theory to teaching lessons. Students have access to the ‘experiential’ model of education where physical skills are used to experience and train in the subject. Vocational teachers speed up this experiential process by helping to rectify bad physical habits and engage students intellectually.

Vocational school is available both as full-time and part-time schools. A full-time vocational school teaches core curriculum subjects and specialist subjects, such as acting, dance and drama full-time, whereas Part-time vocational schools work alongside a child’s traditional schooling, teaching specialist subjects after school or at weekends. There can be academic and vocational grades awarded at the end, depending on what each school offers. The part-time type of school replaces the role of a traditional middle school such as Sylvia Young Theatre School and Tring Park School.

It’s important that vocational schools keep high standards and help children to progress onto specialist further education schools: vocational schools are important places for young people to learn the skills needed for entry into theatre, dance and music crafts, even if they have not had prior experience. Vocations like theatre, dance and music require students to carry out a lot of physical repetition: the region of around 10,000 hours of practice is needed to become an expert before their bodies and minds understand fully.

Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

Choros – A Pas De Trente Deux!

Choros

Today we are highlighting an incredibly hypnotic short film called Choros. Filmed in 2011 by Michael Langan & Terah Maher, Choros is a dizzying combination of music, dance and cinema where a single dancer (Maher) is “layered” over herself 32 times… in effect, a “pas de trente-deux”! Set to Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians, the result is surreal, highly inventive and just plain beautiful to watch.

The filming of Choros references a historical technique called chronophotography, whcih used multiple photographs to enable the scientific study of a subject’s movement. However, Langan and Maher have advanced the technique in Choros through digital innovation, which has lead to multiple international awards since its launch.

Watching the full work requires freeing up some time as it lasts for 13 minutes, but we urge everyone to watch this truly stunning film… it is inspirational!

Dance Performance Theme Ideas

Dance Performance Theme IdeasStuck for some ideas for a theme for your next dance performance? Below is a list that might help to give you some inspiration!

  • The 1980’S
  • A Night At The Movies
  • Alice In Wonderland
  • British History
  • And The Winner Is – A play on the oscars with every dancer being a winner!
  • Anything Goes
  • Around The World
  • Blast From The Past – use songs from past performances in celebration of an anniversary.
  • Cirque De Soleil
  • Colours Or Kaleidoscope – use songs about colours.
  • Come Fly With Me – highlight tourist spots and monuments that you visit on vacation, both man-made and natural.
  • Sea Cruise
  • Dance For A Wish – donate a portion of the money you raise to Make A Wish Foundation Uk.
  • Dance School Musical – use songs about school days.
  • Dancing In The Moonlight
  • Dancing On Ice
  • Dancing Through The Decades
  • Dancing Through The Year
  • Disney
  • Europe
  • Everything Old Is New Again – do an anniversary show and repeat your favourite numbers from previous years.
  • FAME
  • Fantasy
  • Fashion
  • Feelin’ Good
  • Food
  • Growing Up
  • Happiness Is…
  • Historical Figures
  • How We Used To Live
  • Lights, Camera, Dancing!
  • Icons Of Dance
  • Icons Of Music
  • Inspiration
  • Legends, Divas, And Superstars
  • Memories &Amp; New Beginnings
  • Once Upon A Time – choose fairy tales and choreograph the stories
  • One Moment In Time
  • Opposites
  • Peace, Love And Dance
  • Portraits In Dance – works of art relating to your dance style(s).
  • Raising The Barre
  • The Big Top
  • Rock This Town
  • Seasons
  • Shakespeare
  • Shirley Temple
  • Sports
  • Strictly Come Dancing!
  • Superheros
  • Sweet Dreams – use songs relating to the night or dreams.
  • Take Me To The Show – movies, TV, theatre, etc.
  • The Abc Of Dance
  • The Hopes And Dreams Of Siblings
  • The Underwater World
  • The Six Days Of Creation
  • The Swinging Sixties
  • These Are A Few Of Our Favorite Things – have your students list their favourite things and choose songs based on them.
  • The West End
  • Uk Rock Music
  • Walking The Red Carpet
  • Weather

Please feel free to add to the list?